Museums

Aquincum Museum and Roman Ruins : (III. Szentendrei út 139): These two-thousand-year old ruins are remains of the Roman town of Aquincum, and include an impressive ruin of the amphitheatre. The contents of the museum include murals, mosaic floors, a reconstructed water organ and a diorama showing what and how the Roman nobility ate.

 

Budapest History Museum – Castle Museum: (I. Szent György tér 2.): This is the main collection of Budapest’s archæological finds, charting the development of the various settlements from Roman times up until the thirteenth century. Visitors can see part of the mediæval Royal Palace of Buda, also original everyday objects, document seals, weaponry, gravestones, and the Royal Palace’s Gothic statues. There are also exhibitions capturing historical moments from more modern times.

 

Military History Museum (I. Tóth Árpád sétány 40): This contains a remarkable collection of historical weaponry stretching back from before the Turkish wars to the twentieth century; also uniforms, flags, maps, shells, a coin collection containing no fewer than 28,000 items, and an exhibition devoted to the recollections of Hungarian airmen who emigrated after the Second World War.

 

Ferenc Hopp Museum of East Asian Art (VI. Andrássy út 103): The private collection of Ferenc Hopp, assembled in the nineteenth century and at that time numbering four thousand items, was donated to the State after the death of the world-travelling businessman. It has now grown to 19,000 objects – mostly.

 

Museum of Applied Arts (IX. Üllői út 33-37): Housed in one of the most magnificent art nouveau bottles, Italian majolica, Zsolnay ceramics, French furniture, and pieces of Augsburg gold ware from the baroque period.

 

 

Lajos Kassák Memorial Museum (III. Fő tér 1.). This is an exhibition, housed in the one time Zichy mansion house, of art of Lajos Kassák (1887-1967), poet, painter, editor, and one of Hungary’s foremost figures in the From the Legacy of Hungarian Writers showcasing twentieth century Hungarian art.

 

Kiscell Museum (III. Kiscelli u. 108): Administratively part of the Budapest History Museum, the Kiscell Museum is housed in a former Trinitarian monastery in one of the most picturesque parts of the city, and has exhibits covering the modern history of Budapest. It also contains the Budapest Archive artistic collection.

 

 

Museum of Contemporary Art - Ludwig Museum Budapest (Palace of Arts): Here are displayed the modern exhibits of the art-collecting husband and wife Peter and Irene Ludwig, originally from Cologne. The museum concentrates on the last fifty years of modern art in general, and the last ten years of modern Hungarian art in particular.

 

Transport Museum (XIV, Városligeti körút 11.): One of the oldest transport collections in Europe, this boasts a model railway system that is famed the world over. Current exhibitions: A Hundre70d Years Ago and Today, A Century of Hungarian Motoring, Centenary of Hungarian State Shipping, History of Hungarian Public Highways, History of Hungarian Steam Engines, and Budapest Transport History.

 

Hungarian National Gallery (I. Dísz tér 17, Budavári Palota, Buildings B, C and D): This has over 100,000 items reflecting Hungarian history from the Magyar Conquest to the present day. Permanent exhibitions: Mediæval and Renaissance Stonework, Gothic Wooden Statues and Panel Paintings, Late Gothic Winged Altarpieces, Renaissance and Baroque Art, the Habsburg Crypt, Nineteenth Century Hungarian Art and Sculpture, and Twentieth Century Hungarian Art and Sculpture.

 

Hungarian National Museum (VIII. Múzeum krt. 14-16): Now responsible for the safe keeping of over a million objects, the National Museum traces its own history back to 1802 when it was founded with the medal, book and manuscript collection belonging to Count Ferenc Széchenyi. In 1846 it moved into the fine neo-Classical building designed by Mihály Pollack where it has been ever since. Permanent exhibitions: Hungarian History from the Founding of the State until 1990, Lapidarium – Roman Stonework, and Coronation Jewels and Robes.

 

Hungarian Natural History Museum (VIII. Ludovika tér 6): This museum’s mineral and rock exhibits have been housed since 1995 in a group of neo-Classical buildings originally designed as a military academy.

 

Palace of Arts (XIV. Hősök tere): This is the largest exhibition hall in Hungary, where there is a continual stream of temporary exhibitions, mostly of contemporary art.

 

 

 

Nagytétény Castle Museum (XXII. Kastélypark u. 9-11): One of the most splendid baroque palaces in all Hungary is home to the furniture collection belonging to the Museum of Applied Arts. The European Furniture Art Exhibition – 15th to the 19th Century displays over three hundred items.

 

 

Ethnographical Museum (V. Kossuth tér 12): One of the largest museums dedicated to ethnography in the whole of Europe contains 139,000 items of Hungarian origin as well as a further 53,000 items of international interest. Housed in a building of interest in itself – formerly belonging to the Royal Court, opposite the Parliament, and displaying elements of Renaissance, baroque and Classical architecture. Permanent exhibitions: The Traditional Culture of the Magyar People, and From Primitive Society To Civilization.

 

Óbuda Museum (III. Fő tér 1.): This repository of historic documents and objects describing the history of Óbuda and district from Roman times to the twentieth century is housed in the Zichy mansion house. The permanent exhibition includes Museum of Fine Arts (XIV. Hősök tere): Hungary’s premier gallery of non-Hungarian works of art from early times right up to the present day is on display in a stately neo-Classical gallery at Heroes’ Square. The gallery began with a collection donated by Archbishop Pyrker of Eger and an extensive art collection purchased by the State in the 1870’s from the Esterházy family. Today, as well as Egyptian, Roman and Greek exhibits there is a particularly fine collection of Italian art, affording a comprehensive survey of the various schools of painting from the twelfth to the eighteenth centuries. The Spanish collection includes no fewer than seven masterpieces by El Greco.

 

Museum of Fine Arts (XIV. Hősök tere): Hungary’s premier gallery of non-Hungarian works of art from early times right up to the present day is on display in a stately neo-Classical gallery at Heroes’ Square. The gallery began with a collection donated by Archbishop Pyrker of Eger and an extensive art collection purchased by the State in the 1870’s from the Esterházy family. Today, as well as Egyptian, Roman and Greek exhibits there is a particularly fine collection of Italian art, affording a comprehensive survey of the various schools of painting from the twelfth to the eighteenth centuries. The Spanish collection includes no fewer than seven masterpieces by El Greco.

 

Statue Park (XXII. Balatoni út (70-es út) – corner of Szabadkai út. A unique experience awaits visitors to this open-air museum. On display are some of the gargantuan statues and political monuments removed from public display in the streets and squares of Budapest following the fall of Communism.

 

Vasarely Museum (III. Szentlélek tér 6): This museum houses an exhibition selected from the four hundred paintings donated to the Museum of Fine Arts by the Hungarian-born artist and Father of Op-Art, Victor Vasarely. He lived most of his life in Paris.

 

Jewish Museum (VII. Dohány u. 2): A rich collection of exhibits covering many aspects of Judaism is housed in the building adjacent to and designed in a complementary style to the architecturally outstanding Dohány utca Synagogue. Permanent exhibitions feature everyday objects and devotional articles used for the various festivals, and there is a separate section detailing the history of the Holocaust in Hungary.

 

MEO Contemporary Art Collection (IV. József Attila u. 4-6): MEO is a display forum for today’s Hungarian artists. A wonderful individually designed complex of buildings houses exhibitions of Hungarian and international contemporary artists’ work.